Tuesday 20 Nov

BFI STEPHEN STREET

5:30pm Opening Drinks & Press Reception

7:00pm SHORT FILMS MAIN COMPETITION 1

JUDGEMENT by Raymund Ribay Gutierez (15mins, Philippines)
A shattering and widespread plague at all latitudes.
INTERCOURSE by Jonatan Etzler (10mins, Sweden)
“I’ll give you 100 bucks” her boyfriend suggests. She jokingly agrees, but neither of them see the gravity of the situation.
UMBRA (TARIKI) by Saeed Jafarian (15mins, Iran)
Untangling yourself from the fear of being free!
INTIMITY by Elodie Dermange (6mins, Switzerland)
As she showers, dresses and puts on her make-up, a young woman bares her soul – with some shocking revelations.

WEDNESDAY 21 NOVEMBER

SOHO SCREENING ROOMS

5:30pm SHORT PANORAMA

NO GOING BACK by Matias Vellutini (3mins, Brazil)
A rescue mission takes on a dark satanic cult in Brazil.
CRUEL by Marcella Macapani (4mins, Brazil)
A beautifully evocative visual and musical journey through a young woman’s memories, hopes and dreams.

KAATUNGA by Philippe Grenier (5mins, Canada)
A war-weary deserter takes a perilous journey home unveiling a dark family secret.

TALI by Tomer Levine (15mins, Israel)
A wedding photographer hired to film his ex-girlfriend’s wedding, will do whatever it takes to win her back.


LOTTE REININGER. THE UNSUNG HEROINE OF EARLY ANIMATION by Anna Humphries (3mins, UK)
Why did Lotte Reininger, who pioneered early animation, never receive the recognition she deserved?


AURORA by Laura Garcia (15mins, Mexico)
An elderly woman faces the struggle of aging and loneliness head on.


#MEMENTOMORI by Angus Gibson (5mins, UK)
A surprising and touching depiction of memory and grief in the Social Media age.


THE DEAD MAN SPEAKS by Marcos Mereles (3mins, Netherlands)
A dead man ponders his current state.


VICTOR by Sam Tipper (4mins, UK)
In a technology obsessed world, there’s no place for the old.


SLOW DANCE by Christian Zetterberg (6mins, Sweden)
A shy boy at a middle-school dance tackles the new concepts of identity, sexuality and love.

7:45 pm FEATURE FILM – INTERNATIONAL PREMIERE


THE WAIT by Karin Becker (80mins, Germany)
Three felons are notified that their prison sentence will start in just one week. Everything they do from now, will be for the last time.
 

THURSDAY 22 NOVEMBER

THE COVENT GARDEN HOTEL CINEMA

7:00pm FEATURE FILM – UK PREMIERE


THE LITTLE COMRADE by Moonika Siimets (99mins, Estonia)
A profound coming-of-age story set in Soviet Estonia during the Stalinist terror of the 1950’s.

FRIDAY 23 NOVEMBER

THE SOHO HOTEL CINEMA

6:00 pm SHORTS FILMS MAIN COMPETITION 2

THE TRANSFER by by Michael Grudsky (23mins, Israel)
While 3 Israeli soldiers are transferring a prisoner to Megiddo Prison an unexpected complication arises.


LITTLE MONSTER by Charlotte Regan (4mins, UK)
A man gets his first phone call to his daughter after being sent to prison.


THE MANDARIN TREE by Cengiz Akaygun (18mins, Germany)
Freedom starts with imagination.


FRY UP by Charlotte Regan (9mins, UK)
An intimate portrayal of what could be a North London family’s last day together.


NEGATIVE SPACE by Ru Kuwahata & Max Porter (5mins, France)
A father and son unexpectedly bond over the ritual of business trip suitcase packing.


UNO by Javier Marco (10mins, Spain)
Far out at sea, a cell phone floating inside an air-tight bag starts to ring.


A DROWNING MAN by Mahdi Fleifel (15mins, UK/Denmark/Greece)
Alone and far from home, a refugee makes his way through a strange city looking for the means to survive.


GOLD FORTUNE by Rhyme Lu (26mins, USA)
An illegal Chinese immigrant struggles to establish himself in L.A. through corrupt asylum fraud.


WICKED GIRL by Ayce Kartal (8mins, Turkey)
A hospitalised Turkish girl relives happy moments in her grandparents’ village, but horrible memories emerge.


MOTHERING by Lucy Bridger (15mins, UK)
When foster child Mia’s first period arrives in the night an unexpected bond is made.


MAJA by Marijana Jankovic (22mins, Denmark)
A six-year-old Serbian girl is picked up by her parents from her new school in Denmark. She thinks her day is about to come to an end, but it’s only just beginning.


ETERNAL by Sio Tusa (16mins, Australia)
One night, 3 teenagers escape their troubled home lives, only to find that they may have brought the trouble with them.

SATURDAY 24 NOVEMBER

THE SOHO HOTEL CINEMA

6:30pm PADRE (FEATURE FILM) by Giada Colagrande


A moving portrayal of a woman struggling to come to terms with the death of her father.

8:30pm CLOSING NIGHT AWARDS CEREMONY & SCREENING

The awards will be announced followed by screenings of some of the winners. Who will win the coveted Edgeware Grand Prix? Who will take the Edgeware Award for Best British Short? Who will win the Edgeware Jury Prize? Who will take the Mandy Best First Film Award? Which writer will receive the Filmstruck Curzon Award for Best Screenplay?

9:30pm CLOSING NIGHT PARTY

The venue will be revealed at the Saturday screenings. All those at the screenings are welcome to join us.


Throughout November the UK Film Festival in association with Film Bath Festival and Leeds International Film Festival is presenting the following feature films as part of the European Parliament Lux Prize in Bath and in Leeds.

Glory by Kristina Grozeva, Petar Valchanov (Bulgaria, Greece)

Sami Blood by Amanda Kernell (Sweden, Norway, Denmark)

King of the Belgians by Peter Brosens and Jessica Woodworth (Belgium, Netherlands, Bulgaria)

Western by Valeska Grisebach (Germany, Bulgaria, Austria)



To find out about tickets in Bath or Leeds please go to:

www.leedsfilmcity.com
filmbath.org.uk/


 

Lux 2018


The London screenings were presented at the Barbican Cinema.
The UK Film Festival is proud to be screening the 3 finalists in November in Bath and Leeds in association with Film Bath Festival and Leeds International Film Festival.

Druga strana svega/The Other Side of Everything by Serbian director Mira Turajlić is a documentary, which confronts the history of an entire country and society in its fight against nationalism and struggle for democracy. The chronicle of a family in Serbia turns into a searing portrait of an activist in times of great turmoil, questioning the responsibility of each generation to fight for their future.

Kona fer í stríð/Woman at War by Icelandic director Benedikt Erlingsson is a joyful, inventive, energetic and feminist saga of a woman who is a music teacher and lives a double life as a passionate environmental activist. As she begins planning her boldest operation yet, she finds out that her application to adopt a child has finally been accepted and there is a little girl waiting for her in Ukraine.

Styx by Austrian director Wolfgang Fischer appears at first to be a documentary, but is in fact a masterly composed allegory of our polarised world and ambivalence toward the refugee crisis. The protagonist sails of to her dream holiday; a solo yachting voyage in the Atlantic, but after a storm finds herself near a dangerously derelict vessel filled with people who desperately need assistance. The coastguard send her radio instructions to stay completely out of the matter because she is barely equipped to help but this clashes with her sense of social responsibility. Will she sail freely while others drown?

Congratulations to the following ten films that have been nominated for the Lux Prize:

  • Border/Gräns: director Ali Abbassi (Sweden, Denmark)
  • Donbass: director Sergei Loznitsa (Germany, France, Ukraine, Netherlands, Romania)
  • Girl: director Lukas Dhont (Belgium, Netherlands)
  • Happy as Lazzaro/Lazzaro felice: director Alice Rohrwacher (Italy, Switzerland, France, Germany)
  • Mug/Twarz: director Małgorzata Szumovska (Poland)
  • Styx: director Wolfgang Fischer (Germany, Austria)
  • The Other Side of Everything/Druga strana svega: director Mila Turajlić (Serbia, France, Qatar)
  • The Silence of Others/El silencio de los otros: director Almudena Carracedo & Robet Bahar (Spain, USA)
  • U_July 22/Utøya 22.juli: director Erik Pope (Norway)
  • Woman at War/Kona fer í stríđ: director Benedikt Erlingsson (Iceland, France, Ukraine)

About the Lux Film Prize:

The Lux Film Prize is an award given out by MEPs to promote European cinema, make films accessible to larger audiences across languages and cultures, help promising productions circulate beyond their national market and encourage debate about values and social issues across Europe.

The UK Film Festival London represents the Lux Prize in the UK in association with Film Bath Festival and Leeds International Film Festival.